Recharge.IT – The saga of the Nexus 7 battery continues

The Nexus 7 battery being charged by my Swallow Advance battery charger completed charging this morning.

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3328mAh of charge was accepted by the battery – this is a little higher than the 3300mAh charge from the previous day.  If the rated capacity of the 1st generation Nexus 7 is 4375mAh, then this battery’s condition is at about 76% of new.  Each full charge/discharge cycle has a tendency to reduce the lifespan and capacity of a battery.  Most batteries of this type should provide 100% capacity during the first year of its life.  However due to shelf life and storage before use, this capacity may be lower than the rated capacity.  As this battery is at least 2 years old by now, a 76% capacity is actually not too bad and is reasonable for its age.

If you wish to prolong Lithium batteries, you should charge them frequently, but not to full charge, and don’t discharge them all the way.  By having shallow charging and discharge cycles, the life of the battery can be extended.  The downside is that you won’t be able to run the whole day on them otherwise they will go flat.  Always there are advantages and disadvantages, so it is best just to use your normal routine.

Ok – I reconnected the battery to the Nexus 7, and put the back cover on.  I had to press the power button for 30 seconds before it would turn on.  After waiting a while for the screen colour blobs to go around and around, the normal screen came up.  I plugged in the Asus charger and the Nexus displayed “Charging 93%”.  The other applications started up, together with the wireless, and the display was now “Charging 92%”, etc.

After an hour, I noticed that it wasn’t charging, so disconnected the charger and reconnected.  An hour later it is now saying “Charging 82%”.  This is what many Nexus 7 owners are complaining about.  I did vacuum the micro-USB socket – to get rid of dust and lint, which can get in the way of a good connection.  Dust and lint are good at attracting moisture – which then leads to corrosion.  Corrosion is the bane of all electrical connections, so keeping connectors clean is a good idea.  I just vacuumed my Samsung Galaxy S2.

I don’t know the pin code to unlock the tablet – I will have to get that.

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